ISANA national conference, submissions now open! #ISANAconf18

ISANA national conference, submissions now open! #ISANAconf18

This is a gentle reminder that the 29th ISANA International Education Association Conference will be held at the Sydney Masonic Centre, New South Wales on 4 – 7 December 2018.

The theme for the conference is ‘Educate and collaborate: Inclusive practices to enable international students’.

The Program Committee invites you to submit an abstract for presentation. This is an opportunity for you and your colleagues to participate in sharing best practice initiatives and contribute to the success of this national event.

ALL ABSTRACTS DUE 16TH MAY

check details here: http://2018.isanaconference.com/submission

The International Student Experience – Student blog

 

My name is Sostenis. I am a student from Indonesia, currently undertaking postgraduate studies (masters by coursework) at the University of New South Wales, in Sydney, Australia.

I commenced the Combined Masters of Arts and Social Sciences specialising in Educational Leadership and TESOL in February 2017. I am from Jayapura in West Papua, Indonesia, where I hold the position of School Principal at Sekolah Papua Harapan.  I will return to Jayapura at the end of 2018 and plan to implement several key plans, a particular interest of my focus is on providing high quality education by working with the foundation where I work and the government of Papua to improve educational services there, especially the remote areas.

I am a recipient of an Australia Awards Scholarship funded by the Australian Government. As an Australia Awards awardee, besides my academic duties at university, during my time in Sydney, I have been involved in several award-enrichment activities such as participating in workshops and seminars organised by Australia Awards. In addition to that, I also like to explore other extracurricular activities such as networking, visiting colleagues’ schools, doing voluntary works and some paid part-time jobs. Living, studying and working in Sydney has been a great opportunity for me.

Through this blog, I will share some of my stories to inspire many other current/aspiring international students from all over the world to come to Australia and enjoy it to the fullest.

DIBP is now Department of Home Affairs (DHA)

In case you missed it, on the 20 December 2017, the Home Affairs Portfolio (www.homeaffairs.gov.au ), including the Department of Home Affairs (DHA), was formally established. The Australian Border Force comes under the Department of Home Affairs http://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/australian-border-force-abf. This is where ‘Studying in Australia’ and visa related information (including ImmiAccount and VEVO), is now located (use the Tab ‘Individuals and Travellers’).

The name Department of Immigration and Border Protection no longer exists and all related activities have been assimilated into the DHA.

Fairwork Ombudsman: International Student Strategy

You can find more resources here including a range of translations.

https://www.fairwork.gov.au/about-us/our-role/corporate/open-letter-to-international-students/chinese

Visa holders & migrants: information and help available in 30 languages http://www.fairwork.gov.au/languages

Record keeping Do you get pay slips? It’s a legal requirement. Try asking your boss as a first step if you’re not getting one https://www.fairwork.gov.au/pay/pay-slips-and-record-keeping/pay-slips

Deductions FAQ: Is it ok or dodgy for a work uniform ‘deposit’ to be taken from your first pay? It’s not a lawful deduction https://www.fairwork.gov.au/pay/deducting-pay-and-overpayments

Tips for young workers Compulsory meetings = $ payment. Food, clothing or other store products are no substitute https://www.fairwork.gov.au/find-help-for/young-workers-and-students/myths-and-tips-for-young-workers

Ever broken something at work & had it docked from your pay? It’s not ok! https://www.fairwork.gov.au/pay/deducting-pay-and-overpayments

Fair Work Ombudsman: New strategy to raise international students’ awareness of workplace rights

Fair Work Ombudsman: New strategy to raise international students’ awareness of workplace rights

New strategy to raise international students’ awareness of workplace rights

25 September 2017

The Fair Work Ombudsman is reaching out to international students to encourage them to seek free help from the agency if they experience any issues while working in Australia.

The agency has launched a new strategy aimed at raising awareness of workplace rights among international students, who make up a large proportion of temporary entrants to Australia – numbering more than 560,000 as at July 2017.

In an open letter to international students published today, Fair Work Ombudsman Natalie James is encouraging international students to get informed about their workplace rights and, if unsure, seek help.

Ms James has also urged international students to speak up if they have any concerns in relation to their employment, underlining that they have the same workplace rights as all other workers in Australia.

“The number of international students reporting issues to the Fair Work Ombudsman is disproportionately low compared to other categories of visa holders, despite the fact that international students represent a significant proportion of overseas visitors with work rights,” Ms James said.

“We know that international students can be reluctant to speak out when something is wrong, making them particularly vulnerable to exploitation. This is especially the case when students think that seeking assistance will damage future job prospects or lead to the cancellation of their visa.

“We’ve seen cases where employers have threatened international students with deportation for working more than the number of hours permitted under their visa when they have raised questions about their entitlements.

“In some cases these same employers have altered payslips and underpaid hourly rates in order to disguise the number of hours the student has worked,” Ms James said.

“I would like to reassure international students that in line with an agreement between my agency and the Department of Immigration and Border Protection, you can seek our assistance without fear of your visa being cancelled, even if you’ve worked more hours than you should have under your visa.”

The conduct against international students the Fair Work Ombudsman sees is often serious and highly exploitative.

This is reflected by the large percentage of cases the Fair Work Ombudsman files in court that involve one or more international students, despite the low numbers of international students reporting issues to the agency.

Last financial year, 49 per cent of litigations the Fair Work Ombudsman filed in court involved a visa holder – over a third of these involving an international student.

Research commissioned by the Fair Work Ombudsman found that many international students were not aware of their rights under Australian workplace laws and did not know where to go for help.

Some students told researchers they had been subject to intimidation by their employers, who threatened to deport or “blacklist” them for future work if they complained.

“The research showed that when it comes to international students in the Australian workplace, 60 per cent believe that if they report a workplace issue to their employer the situation will either remain the same, or get worse,” Ms James said.

“Our international student strategy focuses on raising international students’ awareness of their workplace rights and letting them know that they can come to the Fair Work Ombudsman for free advice and assistance.

“We know that it can be difficult to understand what is right or wrong at work, or to speak up if you are concerned.

“This is why we are committed to making it as easy as possible for international students to access the help they need,” Ms James said.

Ms James encourages all international students to get informed by visiting the Fair Work Ombudsman website, which has information available in 30 different languages.

Resources available on the website to help workers understand their rights and entitlements include the Pay and Conditions Tool at www.fairwork.gov.au/pay, which can be used to calculate the correct pay rates that apply to their work.

The Fair Work Ombudsman also recently launched its popular Anonymous Report function in 16 languages other than English, enabling non-English speakers to report potential workplace breaches in their own language, without being identified. The tool can be accessed at www.fairwork.gov.au/inlanguageanonymousreport.

The Fair Work Ombudsman’s ‘Record My Hours’ app is aimed at tackling the persistent problem of underpayment of young workers and migrant workers around the country. The app, which equips workers with a record of the time they spend at their workplace by using geofencing technology to register when they arrive at work and when they leave, is available for download from iTunes or Google Play stores.

International students seeking assistance can visit www.fairwork.gov.au or call the Fair Work Infoline on 13 13 94 or our Translating and Interpreting Service on 13 14 50.

Below is a list of some recent matters investigated by the Fair Work Ombudsman involving international students:

New ELICOS standards: Confused? Here’s a clearer picture.

From English Australia 12 October 2017

Education Minister announces the revised standards for Australia’s ELICOS sector

HOBART: The Hon Senator Simon Birmingham, Minister for Education and Training, today reiterated the importance of quality and standards in maintaining Australia’s high reputation as a destination for international students.

Speaking at the Australian International Education Conference the Senator used the Ministerial Address to highlight Australia’s successes in international education, and the important role of ELICOS within that space. He also stressed the need to maintain high standards across the sector. The Senator recognised English Australia’s leading role in driving quality across the ELICOS sector, in particular acknowledging the role of English Australia’s CEO Brett Blacker in the development of legislative and regulatory framework for the sector.

“Australia has always been at the forefront in regard to legislation to support quality in English language teaching and the ELICOS National Standards are the cornerstone of our sectors quality assurance framework, with the new standards upholding that tradition.

The changes announced today will ensure that all providers of courses to international students where the outcome is solely or predominantly English language will need to adhere to the standards, and that is a positive step in ensuring a level playing field for all providers”, noted Brett.

English Australia CEO stated, “there has been some misinterpretation of the new standards, which implied a deficit in the English proficiency of students currently entering Australian Tertiary qualifications. I uphold that the Australian ELICOS sector is highly recognised globally for our course accreditation processes and the quality of educational delivery with a low prevalence of compliance issues, and the sector has been well served by the standards to date”.

Students undertaking ELICOS should note that they will not be directly affected by the scope of the new standards or required to undertake any additional assessment.

The new standard for providers related to direct entry arrangements into tertiary education courses, strengthens existing polices already met by most providers and should not require a significant change to current assessment processes. In consultation with TEQSA, English Australia is confident that a risk based approach will be adopted in the application of this standard.

We will actively work with members to ensure there is clarity in the application of the standards and utilise resources such as our Best Practice Guide to Direct Entry Programs, and we will continue to support providers in demonstrating adherence to the standards.

English Australia is proud to have played an invaluable part in representing our members in the pursuit of robust standards throughout the sector, and will continue to work closely with the Government in the implementation of the ELICOS National Standards.

 

 

15 October 2017

Joint Response from:

A MESSAGE TO INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS SEEKING TO STUDY IN AUSTRALIA

Contrary to some media reports over the past day, a new test is not being imposed to
assess English-language proficiency among international students in Australia.

Australian education institutions already have some of the strongest standards in the world
to ensure that international students can get the most benefit from studying and living here.
Yesterday the Australian Government released updated national standards for ELICOS
(English Language Intensive Courses for Overseas Students), which will apply from 2018.
Some media reports mistakenly suggested a new test is required as part of these new
standards.

There is no requirement for further standardised testing under the ELICOS National
Standards 2018.

Testing is only one form of assessment that may be considered and education providers will
still set their own English language requirements for entry to their courses.

Crucially, also, the revised standards do not change the existing visa requirements to study
in Australia – nor the pathways to further study.

It is important that potential students understand this will not make it harder to study in
Australia.

The ELICOS National Standards 2018 make minor amendments to existing standards to
ensure quality is upheld in the future.

The main change amends the definition of an ELICOS course to bring all registered
intensive English language courses within the scope of the ELICOS standards.

This step has been supported by all peak education bodies as yet another quality measure
to ensure students get the most from their education in Australia.
Australia’s international education industry has been developed with robust regulatory and
quality controls.

This joint communique of Australia’s leading peak bodies for international education affirms
the quality of our ELICOS sector and our shared commitment to safeguard that quality

 

ISANA VIC/TAS 18th state conference, Melbourne

ISANA VIC/TAS 18th state conference, Melbourne

Victorian Parliamentary Secretary Frank Mcguire opened the 18th VIC/TAS conference held at William Angliss Institute last month.

The committee had designed a very comprehensive program and participants were able to walk away with a tool box of ideas to take back to their work place.
Of the 121 attendees It was exciting to see that 25% were students due to the generous grant From Study Melbourne.

There were many opportunities for networking and it was a day of gratitude to all the professionals especially the student advisors who have worked tirelessly to enhance the student experience.

The One day conference has become an important event in the Victoria / Tasmania branch professional development calendar and has grown in strength over the years.

If you have suggestions for PD or events in your state you should contact your local branch committee or submit suggestions here: PD suggest

Congratulations to President Mano Guy and her conference committee!

Congratulations! #ISANAconf17 Bursary Winners

Congratulations! #ISANAconf17 Bursary Winners

Each year ISANA provides bursaries to our national conference. Members and International students from each state are invited to apply.

We would like to congratulate the following students and members who have been awarded the 2017 ISANA Conference bursary and will be joining us on the Gold Coast in December.

Students:
Henness Wong – University of Wollongong
Chen Zhang (Claire) – Flinders University
Thi Thuy Ngan Vo (Mia) – University of Melbourne
Ronja Blomberg – Griffith University

Members:
Catherine Gomes – RMIT University
Abhishek Awasthi – Bendigo Kangan Insitute

Dr Paula Durance – In Appreciation

The ISANA International Education Association is a professional association run by volunteers. The contribution made by members on State and National committees and at our professional development events is invaluable. ISANA could not operate without their contribution, expertise and support.

Dr Paula Durance is no exception, she has most recently been ISANA’s Vice-President (Planning and Development), she was ISANA’s National President in 2005- 2006 and was awarded Life Membership.

Paula advised Council of her decision to resign and step down from the position in July this year to devote more time to family and new ventures.

Paula’s final contribution to ISANA was to organize and chair a planning day to discuss the association’s future strategy. We have reluctantly agreed to accept her resignation and take this opportunity to thank her for time, expertise and support on Council.

We thank Paula for her contribution but know that she will continue to contribute to the international education field.

Inquiry into innovation and creativity: workforce for the new economy. Report Finalised.

ISANA was pleased to submit to this inquiry earlier in 2017:
The Standing Committee on Employment, Education and Training has tabled its report for the Inquiry into innovation and creativity: workforce for the new economy.
The report can be found at the following link.
1345677

ISANA International Education Association Inc
ABN: 42 335 124 078

 

ISANA Secretariat
isana@isana.org.au

 

Office Hours:

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Address:

228 Liverpool Street
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Ph: +61 3 6231 0253

 

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